Appelstein Training Resources, LLC

Workshops for Residential, Foster Care, Juvenile Justice, and All Other Professionals Who Work with At-Risk Children, Youth & Families

Choose either title (presentation is the same):


"The Glass Ain't Half Full, Heck It's Overflowing!"
The Power of a Strength-Based Approach in Reshaping the Lives of At-Risk Children, Youth & Families.

Or:

No Such Thing As a Bad Kid: Key Strength-Based Principles and Techniques for Understanding and Responding to Children, Youth, and Families Struggling with Emotional and Behavioral Challenges.

Our most popular workshop, this one- to three-day training can be presented in 2 to 21 hours to any number of participants. Each attendee receives a 45-page handout, made available in advance to workshop facilitators.



Workshop Description (long version):

Strength-based practice is an emerging approach to helping at-risk children, youth and their families that is exceptionally positive and hope-inspiring. Its focus is on strength-building rather than flaw-fixing. It begins with the belief that every individual has strengths and past successes that can be utilized to stop problem behavior and enhance decision making. This one- or two-day comprehensive workshop will highlight many of the key principles and techniques of this life-changing, inspiring approach to guiding high-risk children, youth, and families.



Areas covered include:

  • The power of a positive attitude and culture from both a neurological and psychological perspective
  • The effects of trauma on the brain and how to create trauma-informed treatment environments
  • Strength-based communication principles and techniques - including reframing, solution-focused techniques, positive predicting, inspirational metaphors, and the millimeter acknowledgement
  • Self-esteem building & activities for at-risk children and youth
  • How to help inflexible and explosive young people
  • The importance of being family centered and creating interlocking partnerships with families and community resources
  • Why, how, and when to use incentive plans
  • Taking humor seriously
  • The importance of controlling personal emotions (i.e. Managing number one first/ responding vs. reacting)
  • Understanding and developing empathy for children and youth who have been traumatized
  • Strategies to prevent problem behavior
  • Core verbal interventions & de-escalation strategies
  • Respectful limit setting
  • What every youth care worker should know about developmental psychology
  • Where it comes from and how to avoid interpersonal and program “splitting.”
  • The do’s and don’ts of personal self-disclosure
  • Using standard behavior management vs. unconditional responses to challenging behavior
  • Creative cognitive behavioral strategies, including the power of rhythmic self-talk and externalizing & naming negative behaviors

Workshop Description (condensed version):

“No Such Thing As a Bad Kid!”

The Power of a Strength-Based Approach in Reshaping the Lives of At-Risk Children and Youth

Strength-based practice is an emerging approach to guiding at-risk children, youth and families that is exceptionally positive and inspiring. Its focus is on strength-building rather than flaw-fixing. It begins with the belief that every individual has or can develop strengths and utilize past successes to mitigate problem behavior and enhance functioning. This presentation will highlight many of the key principles and techniques of this transforming modality. Areas covered include: What is strength-based practice & the power of a positive attitude & culture; the effects of trauma on the brain and how and why to create trauma informed treatment environments, strength-based communication principles and techniques - including reframing, using solution focused questions, positive predicting, the millimeter acknowledgement, and inspirational metaphors; self-esteem building & activities for at-risk children and youth; how to help cognitively inflexible young people; the importance of being family friendly; why, how, and when to use incentive plans; the importance of controlling personal emotions (i.e. managing number one first); respectful limit setting; and a host of creative cognitive behavioral strategies.



A/V requirements: LCD and screen, TV/VCR, and flip-chart. For groups of 50 or more, a lavaliere microphone is requested.

Fee: Negotiable, based on location, time of year, number of attendees, training content, number of training hours and days, required preparation time.

CEUs: Charlie is able to offer CEUS through a colleague in Maryland. Cost is $15/person.

Charlie is able to customize a workshop to meet a program’s needs. Many of the topic areas listed above can be weaved into a 90 minute or 2 hour workshop. Popular two-hour workshops: Use the Force, Luke! Managing Number One and Staying Motivated to Make a Difference; Spock Talk! What Every Youth Care Professional Should Know About Developmental Psychology. Charlie also conducts workshops on effective, strength-based supervision & leadership – as well as his two- or three-day Train The Trainer Seminar.



Learning Objectives:

Attending this continuing education activity, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the major principles of a strength-based approach to working with at-risk children and youth.
  • Discuss the importance of personal self-awareness and self-management in working with at-risk children, youth, and families.
  • Cite specific strength-based verbal interventions that help professionals engage and motivate at-risk children, youth, and families
  • Develop individualized behavioral support strategies that help children learn to self-manage.
  • Describe at least two specific cognitive-behavioral techniques that can help at-risk children, youth, and their parents to better self-manage their actions.


Bibliography:

Achor, S. The Happiness Advantage. New York, NY. Crown Press. 2010

Appelstein, C. No Such Thing As a Bad Kid: Understanding and Responding to the Challenging Behavior of Troubled Children and Youth. Weston, MA. Gifford School, 1998

Appelstein, C. The Gus Chronicles I: Reflections From An Abused Kid. Salem, NH. Appelstein Training Resources, 1999

Bertolino, R. Therapy with Troubled Teenagers. New York, NY. Wiley and Sons, 1999

Gladwell, M. Outliers: The Story of Success. New York, NY Little, Brown and Company, 2008

Glasser, W. Choice Theory. New York, NY. Harper Collins, 1999

Greene, R. The Explosive Child. New York, NY. Harper Collins, 1998

Lavoie, R., It’s So Much Work to Be Your Friend. New York, NY. Simon and Schuster, 2005

Saks, O. Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain. New York, NY. 2007, Alfred A. Knopf; London: Picador

 

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